Our Greatest Invention is still Unfolding

The Printing Press

Mankind’s Greatest Invention

Think of a world where every text you read has been written by hand. Books are most often limited to one copy, sometimes several if it were a bible, but there exists no mass production of textbooks, scholarly journals, or any kind of literature. Your labels would also all be written by hand and stuck to jars with a crude smelling paste. Obviously this is not a very enjoyable world for any business owner. Something had to be done!

The printing press was first invented in China. In the first millennium A.D, this was done using wooden blocks of text. These would be applied to a scroll with ink to provide a standardised text for circulation. This was labour intensive and would take weeks to generate copy; but it was a start.

The current printing press therefore takes its shape from Johannes Gutenberg who refined the Chinese designs by 1450. A German exile living in Strasbourg, Gutenberg worked tirelessly on his designs to provide for mass information standardisation.

Printing provided a means by which to rapidly disseminate ideas across Europe, providing uniform information for ordinary people and effectively challenging the monarchies and existing societal institutions of the time. Mass communication spread ideas like wildfire. The printing press enabled the scientific revolution to catch wind. Intellectuals were now able to share their findings with scholars from across Europe.

Coupled with the enlightenment, the ushering of the modern age dawned on humankind. Propaganda, newspapers, magazines, literature and a myriad of other information mediums owe their existence to Gutenberg and the printing press of the 1450’s.

Today, we have built on the printing press by applying new technologies and designs – providing professional printing tailored to the 21st century. If you think that the printing revolution has slowed, you’re wrong – humans now boast 3D printing capabilities and a plethora of printing presses (such as the Trojan range) which can revolutionise industries and bring life to a brand. What would Johannes Gutenberg say about that?

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